Press Release

New York Times On Val Arkoosh: “Rising Prominence Of Abortion As Motivator Of Democratic Voters Plays To Dr. Arkoosh’s Strengths As A Doctor”

December 10, 2021

New York Times On Val Arkoosh: “Rising Prominence Of Abortion As A Potential Motivator Of Democratic Voters In Midterm Elections Plays To Dr. Arkoosh’s Strengths As A Doctor”

Times Highlights Val’s “Aggressive Response” To COVID-19, Contrast To Oz

 

NORRISTOWN — Yesterday the New York Times profiled Val Arkoosh’s unique position in Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senate race, noting that the “rising prominence of abortion as a potential motivator of Democratic voters in midterm elections plays to Dr. Arkoosh’s strengths as a doctor.”

 

They also note that Val “helped lead an aggressive response to the pandemic as the leader of the Montgomery County board of commissioners,” providing a direct contrast to Dr. Oz’s candidacy.

 

On abortion, Val told the Times: “As a physician who has sat at the bedside of women who have had to make some of the most difficult decisions of their lives…there is no place for any politician in those decisions…And I think this is going to be an issue that gets women, and particularly suburban women, out in numbers.’’

 

The Times also highlighted Val’s base in southeast Pennsylvania, calling the county she has represented for years “ground zero for the suburban shift to Democrats in recent years.” 

 

Read more below and HERE.


New York Times: The Pennsylvania Senate Candidate Running as the Anti-Dr. Oz

By Trip Gabriel – December 9, 2021

  • Dr. Val Arkoosh is the Pennsylvania Senate candidate who is often an afterthought compared to the two front-running Democrats, John Fetterman and Conor Lamb.

  • But a couple big recent developments — the chance of the Supreme Court sweeping away Roe v. Wade and the entry of Dr. Mehmet Oz into the race’s Republican primary — may give her underdog campaign new momentum.

  • Dr. Arkoosh, a physician in obstetric anesthesiology and a top elected official in Montgomery County in the Philadelphia suburbs, is trying to pitch herself as a kind of anti-Dr. Oz.

  • “It really does take a doctor to stand up to a doctor,” Dr. Arkoosh told me. “I don’t even know how he still has a license, with some of the stuff that comes out his mouth,” she said of his promotion of unproved Covid-19 treatments early in the pandemic.

  • Dr. Oz, who jumped into the race last week, is framing his candidacy as a conservative’s response to the pandemic, pushing back against mandates, shutdowns and limits to “freedom.”

  • Dr. Arkoosh, on the other hand, helped lead an aggressive response to the pandemic as the leader of the Montgomery County board of commissioners. In an interview, she contrasted her efforts to ensure the safety of students in her county to Dr. Oz’s position on schools at the time: During the same month that she canceled graduation ceremonies last year, Dr. Oz urged on Fox News that schools should be open because it “may only cost us 2 to 3 percent in terms of total mortality” of the population. He later said he “misspoke.”

  • Dr. Arkoosh is liberal on issues — she wants to ban fracking and to add a public option to the health care marketplace — but what sets her apart may be demographics.

  • …Dr. Arkoosh’s base, Montgomery County — the state’s third most populous and the second richest — is ground zero for the suburban shift to Democrats in recent years. In all, Philadelphia and its suburbs in southeast Pennsylvania contribute 50 percent of the state’s Democratic primary voters.

  • “In Montgomery County in 2020, we gave President Biden 66,000 more votes than we gave Hillary Clinton,” Dr. Arkoosh said. “It is where my base is, where my strength is.”  Even so, the rising prominence of abortion as a potential motivator of Democratic voters in the midterm elections plays to Dr. Arkoosh’s strengths as a doctor. Her specialty means she administers anesthesia to women giving birth and women having abortions.
  • “As a physician who has sat at the bedside of women who have had to make some of the most difficult decisions of their lives,” she said, “there is no place for any politician in those decisions.”

  • Arguments before the Supreme Court last week suggested the conservative majority was ready to reverse or severely limit Roe v. Wade in a ruling next year.

  • “I think this is going to be a very big issue,” Dr. Arkoosh said.  “And I think this is going to be an issue that gets women, and particularly suburban women, out in numbers.’’

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